Lincoln Hound Society

Off - Leash!
Your spot to bark out!

Do Dogs Have Souls?

Written by Paul White

I have trained quite a few guide dogs and at least 120 wheelchair service dogs.What I trained them to do was the tasks that help people who are disabled. The dogs learn how to open doors turn off the lights at the light switch and watch for traffic and guide around bushes and low branches.

Once the dogs are placed a transformation happens. The dogs realize the person can't see, or the person can't walk. They move from simply doing what they were trained to do, to compassion, doing far more than I ever trained them to do. I can site example after example because it happens not to just a few of the dogs I have trained but to every single one.

A young girl who has Cerebral Palsy has a spastic reflex that cause her to movements to be jumpy and her muscles over react, even in trying to grab something to pick something up off a table. Her a dog a chocolate lab was trying to give her something she asked for. In trying to take it from him she would accidentally knock it out of his mouth and it would fall to the ground. The dog would again pick up the item and move to a different position to give the item to her. Again she would fumble the item and it would fall again to the ground. Again the dog would try and the item fall again. She began to cry in her frustration of her own body. The dog picked up the item and while in her wheelchair he came up on her lap. He laid his front legs and his upper body across her lap and turned his head and dropped the item between him and her. The item was now trapped between them. It gave her the opportunity to grab the item and finally hold it.

I never taught the dog to do this. I only taught the dog to retrieve. Most dogs would have given up. If you ask your dog to retrieve something for you and you slap or knock it out of his mouth every time he tries to give it to you, most dogs will quit doing it.

How is that possible? If you have no emotions how can you read them or understand or recognize them? In fact the they way communicate is with emotion. It isn't human emotion. I am not trying to say they have human emotions but yet they have emotions that are clear that we see in them and in fact they see in us. We are so similar it is haunting how similar we are.

Think for a moment, why? Is this just a smart dog who just solved a problem? That isn't really emotion. Yet what made the dog keep trying? He knew she didn't mean to knock the item, or drop it. Her emotions were that she was trying. He understood that. It is often said that dogs are excellent reading human emotions. How is that possible? If you have no emotions how can you read them or understand or recognize them? In fact the they way communicate is with emotion. It isn't human emotion. I am not trying to say they have human emotions but yet they have emotions that are clear that we see in them and in fact they see in us. We are so similar it is haunting how similar we are.

You can see in dogs when they are excited, happy, sad, bored, jealous, lonely, afraid, confident, affectionate, nervous, careful, compassionate, angry, frustrated, depressed. You can see those and many other emotions. They see those emotions in us. They recognize the emotions we have because they have those emotions. It is they way they communicate. They speak the language of emotions.

But dogs are different. They lack an understanding of time as we know it. You have heard dogs live in the moment, and they do. Dogs have a very small brain. Far smaller than you think. They don't remember things that are not significant. They don't plan in future, nor are they vindictive. Their minds are not that complex. They do live in the moment. In many ways dogs teach us to be more human. Many of the lessons they teach us are often what we consider the real lessons that make us more human.


Paul White is a former guide dog instructor and for 10 years was the director of training for a service dog program Leashes for Living Assistance Dog School, in San Diego.

Posted with permission from Do More For Dogs

Safety First: A Primer for Parents, Kids and Dogs (PDF)
Good Article on Child/pet safety.

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Susahn's Pet Tips

Cleaning of Pets Toys

Your pet's collection of plush toys deserves a good cleaning at least once a season to prevent harmful bacteria and/or dust mites from making your house their home. Othello recommends washing plush toys in hot water with your usual laundry detergent and bleach for colors. If the plush toys reside outside, then a second run through the wash cycle is also recommended. Tumble dry the plush toys on the low setting.

Othello usually runs the dry cycle two or three times to ensure
the underbellies of all his babies are good and dry.

No worries for the squeaky components of the plush toys. Once dry, the squeaks and squawks will return.What about the hard, plastic chew toys? A hot water soak and hand washing with your dish soap will do the trick. Be sure to rinse thoroughly to remove all soap residues.

Leaving Your Pet in a Parked Car can be a Deadly Mistake

On a warm day the temperature in a parked car can reach 160 degrees in a matter of minutes, even with partially opened windows. With only hot air to breathe, your pet can quickly suffer brain damage or die from heatstroke.

Signs of heat stress:

  • heavy panting
  • glazed eyes
  • rapid pulse
  • dizziness,
  • vomiting, and/or deep red or purple tongue

    If your pet gets overheated, you must lower his/her body temperature immediately!

    • Get your pet into shade and apply cool (not cold) water all over his/her body.
    • Apply ice packs or cold towels only to your pets head, neck, and chest
    • Let your pet drink small amounts of cool water or lick ice cubes or ice cream
    • Get you pet to a veterinarian right away. It could save his/her life.

    On hot days your pet is safer at home! This information is provided by:
    The Humane Society of the United States
    2100 L Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037


Snoopy’s Column

The Burbank Velodrome

On Sept. 16, 2006 Lincoln Hound Society member and Co-Chair Ed Hodges unveiled a commemorative plaque and display case with photos on the site of the football stadium at Lincoln High School, which sits on the Burbank Velodrome's former site.

Formally called the Garden City Velodrome, it soon became known as the Burbank Velodrome because of its location in the Burbank neighborhood. It closed at the end of the 1941 season.

Ed has been working for two years to see that future generations will be aware of the velodrome and its history.

For a more historical infomration on the Veldrome, please visit the Rose Garden Resident for a full coverage story by reporter Mary Gottschalk

Your Snoopy Reporter
Robert Walker

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